Saint Priest-Martyr Monan of Isle of May & 6.600 Martyrs in Fife, Scotland (+874) – March 1

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ENGLISH ORTHODOX WEB 1

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Ruins of the Monastery of Saint Andrian on Isle of May, Scotland

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Saint Priest-Martyr Monan of Isle of May

& 6.600 Martyrs in Fife, Scotland (+874)

March 1

Saint Monan lived in the 9th century. He was a companion of Martyr Saint Adrian/Ethernan who was Abbot in the Monastery of Isle of May in Scotland.

After the Martyrdom of Saint Andrian of the Monastery of Isle of May by Vikings, Saint Monan went on to Inverey in Fife and set up a chapel.

He martyred with 6.600 Christians by Viginks in Fife, Scotland, on 874.

Saint Monan’s feast day is March 1.

“Christ is Risen” in Celtic languages

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ORTHODOX WEB

“Christ is Risen” in Celtic languages

Goidelic

Old Irish – Asréracht Críst! Asréracht Hé–som co dearb!
Irish – Tá Críost éirithe! Go deimhin, tá sé éirithe!
Manx – Taw Creest Ereen! Taw Shay Ereen Guhdyne!
Scottish Gaelic – Tha Crìosd air èiridh! Gu dearbh, tha e air èiridh!

Brythonic

Breton – Dassoret eo Krist! E wirionez dassoret eo!
Cornish – Thew Creest dassorez! En weer thewa dassorez!
Welsh – Atgyfododd Crist! Yn wir atgyfododd!

Source: OrthodoxWiki

St. John The Baptist, the Orthodox Monastery, Tolleshunt Knights, Essex, England

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

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St. John The Baptist, the Orthodox Monastery,

Tolleshunt Knights, Essex, England

If you want go to the St. John the Baptist Monastery and talk with Father Zacharias.

The address is:

The Old Rectory, Rectory Road,

Tolleshunt Knights, By Maldon,

Essex CM9 8EZ, United Kingdom

Tel.: (+44) (0) 1621 816 471

to get there from LONDON

1. go to Liverpool Street Station (you can get there by UNDERGROUND)

2. get a train to WITHAM

3. get a taxi to the monastery of Saint John the Baptist (say Tolleshunt Knights if the taxi driver does not know the monastery)

https://www.facebook.com/monasterystjohnbaptistessex/info?tab=page_info

https://www.facebook.com/monasterystjohnbaptistessex

FACEBOOK OF MONASTERY ST JOHN BAPTIST ESSEX

Click HERE

Fr. Meletios Weber, England: Through Oxford to Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* England, USA & the Netherlands

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

USA OF MY HEART

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Fr. Meletios Webber

ENGLAND, USA, THE NETHERLANDS

From Protestantism to Orthodoxy

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Through Oxford To Orthodoxy

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

Through Oxford To Orthodoxy

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Archimandrite Meletios Webber, of Scottish background, was born in London, and received his Masters degree in Theology from Oxford University, England and the Thessalonica School of Theology, Greece. He also holds an E.D.D. (doctorate) in Psychotherapy from the University of Montana, Missoula. He is the author of two published books: Steps of Transformation; an Orthodox Priest Explores the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous (Conciliar Press, 2003); and Bread and Water, Wine and Oil; an Orthodox Christian Experience of God (Conciliar Press, 2007).

This interview was originally published in Pravoslavnie.ru.

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Fr. Meletios, could you tell us a little about your journey to Orthodoxy in Oxford, and how you became a priest?

I went to Oxford as a theology student in 1968, and very quickly found an Orthodox Church there. The parish priest at the time was Fr. Kallistos Ware, who is now Metropolitan of Diokleia, and the deacon at the time was Fr. Basil Osborne, who is now Bishop of Amphipolis. The parish in Oxford was both a Russian and a Greek one, coexisting in a small room in what had once been the house of the famous Dr. Spooner. I was immediately attracted to the quality of the stillness that I found in that small room. That has been something that I have consistently valued in the Orthodox Church ever since. It is a quality which is difficult to talk about, but it happens when one goes into a space which is so obviously God-filled. That is something that I found very important and very attractive at that time. Under the tutelage of Fr. Kallistos I became Orthodox three years later, and I was ordained a priest some three years after that in January of 1976, by Continue reading “Fr. Meletios Weber, England: Through Oxford to Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* England, USA & the Netherlands”

Orthodoxy In An English Village – by Fr. George Hackney

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

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Orthodoxy In An English Village

by Fr. George Hackney

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2010/11/orthodoxy-in-an-english-village-by-fr-george-hackney/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Near to the geographical centre of England you can find Rolleston, the tiny village where I was born. My family were farmers, as their ancestors had been for generations. In the heart of the village and under the jurisdiction of the Church of England stood the ancient parish church of The Holy Trinity. For centuries it had been the centre of village life. There were no other denominations in the village.

As a child I did not even know that other denominations existed. It was in the Church of England that I was baptised and taught the orthodox Christian Faith. It was in the Church of England alone that I learned and accepted the great Orthodox dogmas concerning the Holy Trinity, Creation, Incarnation, Virgin Birth, Resurrection, Salvation through Christ our God from sin, death and the devil, the necessity for sacramental incorporation by Continue reading “Orthodoxy In An English Village – by Fr. George Hackney”

The Life of Fr. John Maitland Moir, Scotland (1924-2013)

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ORTHODOXY OF MY HEART

The Life of Fr. John Maitland Moir,

Scotland (1924-2013)

Source:

https://journeytoorthodoxy.com

The Life of Fr. John Maitland Moir

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Below is his official obituary. Our prayers go to all who knew and loved him, and for the repose of his holy soul.

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Father John Maitland Moir, Priest of the Orthodox Church of St Andrew in Edinburgh, founder of many smaller Orthodox communities throughout Scotland and Orthodox Chaplain to the University of Edinburgh, died peacefully in Edinburgh Royal Infirmary on the 17th April 2013.

A man of profound holiness and bedazzling eccentricity, of boundless compassion and canny wisdom, utterly selfless and stubbornly self-willed, serenely prayerful and fiercely self-disciplined, Father John will surely earn a place as a unique and outstanding figure in the ecclesiastical annals of Scotland. He was born in 1924 in the village of Currie where his father was the local doctor; his fondness for his mother was always mingled with quiet pride in the fact that she was a member of the lesser aristocracy. The privileged but somewhat severe upbringing of an only child in this household together with a Continue reading “The Life of Fr. John Maitland Moir, Scotland (1924-2013)”

A letter to a new convert by Mother Thekla, Abbess of Orthodox Monastery of the Assumpion in North Yorkshire, England

http://conversionstoorthodoxy.wordpress.com

CONVERSIONS TO ORTHODOXY

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A letter to a new convert by Mother Thekla,

Abbess of  Orthodox Monastery of the Assumpion

in North Yorkshire, England

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

Mother Thekla’s Letter To A New Convert

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Mother Thekla, who died on Aug. 7, 2011 at aged 93, was the last surviving nun to have occupied the enclosed Orthodox Monastery of the Assumption in North Yorkshire, but became better known to the wider world as the spiritual muse of the composer Sir John Tavener. Mother Thekla wrote the following letter in 2009, when she was 91 years old. You can read more about her here.

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Dear “John”,

I understand that you are on the way to becoming Orthodox. I know nothing about you, beyond the fact that you are English.

Before we go any further, there is one point I should make clear. I have not been told why you are about to convert, but I assure you there is no point whatsoever if it is for negative reasons. You will find as much “wrong” (if not more) in Orthodoxy as in the Anglican or Roman Churches.

So – the first point is, are you prepared to face lies, hypocrisy, evil and all the rest, just as much in Orthodoxy as in any other religion or denomination?

Are you expecting a kind of earthly paradise with plenty of incense and the right kind of music?

Do you expect to go straight to heaven if you cross yourself slowly, pompously and in the correct form from the right side?

Have you a cookery book with all the authentic Russian recipes for Easter festivities?

Are you an expert in kissing three times on every possible or improper occasion?

Can you prostrate elegantly without dropping a variety of stationery out of your pockets?

OR…..

Have you read the Gospels?

Have you faced Christ crucified? In the spirit have you attended the Last Supper – the meaning of Holy Communion?

AND….

Are you prepared, in all humility, to understand that you will never, in this life, know beyond Faith; that Faith means accepting the Truth without proof. Faith and knowledge are the ultimate contradiction –and the ultimate absorption into each other.

Living Orthodoxy is based on paradox, which is carried on into worship – private or public.

We know because we believe and we believe because we know.

Above all, are you prepared to accept all things as from God?

If we are meant, always, to be “happy”, why the Crucifixion? Are you prepared, whatever happens, to believe that somewhere, somehow, it must make sense? That does not mean passive endurance, but it means constant vigilance, listening, for what is demanded; and above all, Love.

Poor, old, sick, to our last breath, we can love. Not sentimental nonsense so often confused with love, but the love of sacrifice – inner crucifixion of greed, envy, pride.

And never confuse love with sentimentality.

And never confuse worship with affectation.

Be humble – love, even when it is difficult. Not sentimental so called love – And do not treat church worship as a theatrical performance!

I hope that some of this makes sense,

With my best wishes,
Mother Thekla
(sometime Abbess of the Monastery of the Assumption, Normanby)

Finding the Faith of St Joseph of Arimathea: An Interview with Fr. Jonathan Hemmings, England ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* The tradition of faith in Great Britain goes back to the Apostolic era!

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

ORTHODOX HEART

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Finding the Faith of St Joseph of Arimathea:

An Interview with Fr. Jonathan Hemmings, England

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The tradition of faith in Great Britain goes back to the Apostolic era!

by Tudor Petcu

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

Finding the Faith of Joseph of Arimathea: An Interview with Fr. Jonathan Hemmings

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

A Romanian writer, Tudor is a graduate of the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest, Romania. He has published a number of articles related to philosophy and theology in different cultural and academic journals. His work focuses on the evolution of Orthodox spirituality in Western societies as well and he is going to publish a book of interviews with Westerners converted to Orthodoxy. In this article, he interviews Fr. Jonathan Hemmings, Orthodox theologian, who is the priest of the Holy Life-Giving Cross Orthodox Church in Lancaster, UK, talks about faith and love in Christ.

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1.) Before discussing your conversion to Orthodoxy, I would appreciate it a lot if you could talk about your main spiritual experiences and journies untill you have discovered the Orthodox Church.

First of all, we need to be sure of what we mean when we use the term convert or “conversion.” We all need to be converted – both those who come from different traditions and confessions and those from traditionally Orthodox countries who are referred to as “cradle Orthodox”. Christianity is not a Philosophy, it is a relationship with the All Holy Trinity. We are converted to Christ and we are received into the (Orthodox) Church through Baptism and/or Chrismation. Sometimes this happens in the other order of events. Those who are Baptised Orthodox as babies need to employ the gift of the Holy Continue reading “Finding the Faith of St Joseph of Arimathea: An Interview with Fr. Jonathan Hemmings, England ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* The tradition of faith in Great Britain goes back to the Apostolic era!”

A Journey Of Faith In New Zealand – Alexandra Wood, England

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NEW ZEALAND OF MY HEART

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A Journey Of Faith In New Zealand

by Alexandra Wood

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.comHERE

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

When I was a little girl it was still possible to teach Scripture in schools and even people who did not attend church were happy for their children to be taught.

I remember as a child of eight or nine that I pictured in my mind one night the Mount of Olives with a bright full moon and a grove of trees and Jesus praying. I was very moved.

We heard “The Man Born to Be King” by Dorothy L Sayers on the radio, not the original 1940 broadcast of course! There was a very good TV series called “Jesus of Nazareth” which was repeated several times on the BBC I think. William Barclay also was a popular broadcaster later in my teens and I owe him a lot.

I was always interested in the daily life of the people in my Scripture lessons so I became interested in the daily life of the Romans in Britain, the Ancient Britons etc. as I went up through school. I had the advantage of living in the City of London where excavations were part of daily life. I left school at the age of nineteen and went to the Institute of Archaeology to learn to be a Museum Technician. So, Scripture took me to archaeology.

I realised from then on that to be Christian was not fashionable among the intelligentsia and also that those who furiously spurned religion in general did not apply the same standard of proof which they demanded in their own research.

I was not impressed by the intelligentsia. Therefore, I decided to make a hypothesis that God existed. It seemed that more learned people than I could ever be had, in the past, overcome what I could perceive as “Objections to Christianity,” therefore I would try to see if the orthodox teachings actually worked if taken as a practical blueprint for life. This seemed to me to be a more scientific method of assessment.

The book “Mere Christianity” by C.S. Lewis, followed by most of his other religious and ethical essays formed my mind at this time When I got to University as an adult student I found that I had to study Fine Art as part of my Prehistoric Archaeology course along with Ancient History. These were fortunate aberrations for me as D. Talbot Rice was our Art History professor and we had to consider Icons and Byzantine history and we also found ourselves taking in Late Antiquity as we studied Post Roman / Early Christian Archaeology in Britain and Ireland with Charles Thomas. While studying the origins of the monastic movement for Late Roman Archaeology I read “The Desert Fathers” translated by Nora Chadwick(?) and “The Desert a City” by Derwas Chitty and so came across the hermits and St Pachomius, the early British Saints and the extent of the Church in Britain and Ireland. Edinburgh University certainly gave us a good, wide, thorough education!

When I came to New Zealand I finally found myself joining the Anglican Church in the seventies because at the time there was a very orthodox feeling to the church, at least in the parishes. I did find, though, the clergy I met strangely uneducated in early church history and about the Orthodox Church.

The New Zealand Anglican Church then went through some strange and turbulent times with the Charismatic Movement etc.etc.

I found, after a while, that it got most of my pastoral help not from sermons but from the books of John White a professor of psychiatry in Manitoba, one which I am rereading now. It is called “Flirting with the World” and is about worldliness in the church. I also found a very sobering book called “Crumbling Foundations” by Donald G Bloesch about the death of the mainline churches in North America and the opportunity for rebirth as the original faith grounded in apostolic witness. It seemed to mirror concerns I felt here, in New Zealand

I remained in the Anglican church because I found nowhere else to go.

A few years ago I found a book in the public library called “The Orthodox Way” by Timothy Ware and because I was still interested in Late Roman Antiquity I got it out

I read it from time to time and then came the Internet.

Through the Internet I found the British Antiochian Orthodox Church and I asked the priest at Colchester which is near my brother, Fr. Alexander Haig, if there was any Antiochian Orthodox church in New Zealand. He surprised me by saying there was! In the end I found out where Fr Jack Witbrock was living. I also received much help from Fr Gregory Hallam in Manchester and of course there are the plethora of sites on Orthodox topics. None of this was possible before the World Wide Web.

So now I am Orthodox Christian and my patron saint is St Alexandra, wife of Diocletian. Back to late Antiquity! My way to Orthodoxy took many turns but was aided at all times by books and broadcasting and by the Internet so it was a very personal journey, tailor-made to my circumstances. I still continue the great experiment.

The New Zealand Antiochian church is scattered through out the land now. You may visit this site where you will discover a lively community under the guidance of Metropolitan Paul in Australia.

Link: Saint Dunstan Orthodox Christian Church in Poole, England

http://havefaithorthodoxy.wordpress.com

HAVE FAITH – ORTHODOXY

http://www.saint-dunstan.org

Saint Dunstan Orthodox Christian Church in Poole, England

A Parish of the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of the British Isles and Ireland

Patriarchate of Antioch and all the East

Saint Osmund’s Road, Parkstone, Poole, BH14 9JG

Church Phone: 01202 602628

Poole, England

 

The Father Of Lights – By Constantine Georgiades, England – Journey to Orthodoxy

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COMING HOME – ORTHODOXY

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The Father Of Lights

By Constantine Georgiades, England

Journey to Orthodoxy

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

The Father Of Lights

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

A team of 120 members of the London Robbery Squad arrested me, my builder and electrician in Devon on 17th April 1991. I had to strip, put on white paper suit and wait in a cold empty cell for 3 days and then I was charged with various conspiracy offenses and remanded in custody at Exeter Prison. I had often driven past the prison and had never considered that one day I might be a guest of Her Majesty!

As an ex-policeman, I was warned to ask for the ’43’s’ by the escorting officer, but I really hadn’t understood what that meant. A mistake had been made and I felt sure that it was only a matter of time before I would be released, so I insisted on going on the main wing with all the other men and refused ‘Rule 43’ protection.

News of my arrival travelled fast and I soon had hundreds of men wanting to vent their anger out on me, due solely to the fact that I had once been a policeman. It didn’t matter that I had left some years earlier. As far as they were concerned, I was still a policeman and ‘the enemy’.

Escorted to ‘B’ wing with 2 other inmates I was locked in a cell the size of a bus shelter. After having lived my life in relative luxury up until that moment, it came as quite a shock to have to share a cell with 2 total strangers! It was filthy, no toilet and only the use of a bucket, no sink, little ventilation and poor lighting and the stench of urine and excrement was overpowering.

As he closed the door I heard the Prison Officer grunt “Three more pieces of s*** off the street”. I knew that I had done some bad things in my time, but I never thought that I had deserved to be treated or spoken to in this manner. The three of us remained in these conditions for periods of up to 23 hours a day and trying to cope with the monotony and violence of prison life was difficult.

At first ‘bang up’ seemed like a lifeline to me as it was difficult to kill a man whilst he was locked away in a cell! Although I had a strong physical presence, I knew that I couldn’t defend myself against 600 men and I was gripped with terror. I ate very little for the first three weeks and my weight dropped by nearly 4 stone. The food repulsed me and I couldn’t bring myself to eat it, but my fellow inmate said “If you don’t eat you will die in here”. He was right of course and I had already considered that as one of my options for early release.

I spent the first 14 months on remand walking in my own strength, unable to see my children and being systematically stripped of all my worldly possessions. You can’t keep up your mortgage payments when you are in prison.

Daily I sifted through my food searching for pieces of broken glass and slivers of razor blades and smelling it for traces of chemicals. There are more ways of getting to someone that you hate in prison than you can imagine! I grew more angry by the day at the injustice done to me and I wanted revenge against those who had put me there. I scoured my life searching for answers. Every day I mourned for my son Peter who had died as a baby whilst the family were Continue reading “The Father Of Lights – By Constantine Georgiades, England – Journey to Orthodoxy”

Video: Human Relationships in the Light of Christ – Q&A ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Father Zacharias of Essex Monastery, England

http://easternorthodoxchurch.blogspot.com

EASTERN ORTHODOX CHURCH

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Human Relationships in the Light of Christ

Q&A – Father Zacharias of Essex Monastery, England

“Human Relationships in the Light of Christ”, talk given by Archimandrite Zacharias in the Orthodox Christian Church in Edinburgh, on 8th of November 2012.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

St. John The Baptist, the Orthodox Monastery, Tolleshunt Knights, Essex, England

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If you want go to the St. John the Baptist Monastery and talk with Father Zacharias.

The address is:

The Old Rectory, Rectory Road,

Tolleshunt Knights, By Maldon,

Essex CM9 8EZ, United Kingdom

Tel.: (+44) (0) 1621 816 471

to get there from LONDON

1. go to Liverpool Street Station (you can get there by UNDERGROUND)

2. get a train to WITHAM

3. get a taxi to the monastery of Saint John the Baptist (say Tolleshunt Knights if the taxi driver does not know the monastery)

https://www.facebook.com/monasterystjohnbaptistessex/info?tab=page_info

https://www.facebook.com/monasterystjohnbaptistessex

FACEBOOK OF MONASTERY ST JOHN BAPTIST ESSEX

 

Holy and Life-Giving Cross, Orthodox Parish, Lancaster, England, UK – 2 Videos

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https://unitedkingdomofmyheart.wordpress.com

GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

IRELAND & BRITISH ISLES

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Holy and Life-Giving Cross, Orthodox Parish,

Lancaster, England, UK

Source:

http://orthodoxcityhermit.com

Holy and Life-Giving Cross, Orthodox Parish, Lancaster, UK

ORTHODOX CITY HERMIT

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The First Holy Liturgy in the new Temple of the Orthodox Christian Parish of the Holy and Life-Giving Cross at Lancaster (United Kingdom)

During my last visit at the UK I had the blessing to witness the opening of a new Temple at the St Martin’s of Tours Church, Braddon Close, Westgate, Lancashire for the Holy Cross Parish. Before my arrival on 9th March, the faithful had already set up the Church of St Martin , installed the Iconostasis, and it was beginning to look very much like an Orthodox Church already.

Have a look at more photos of the making of the iconostasis (a combined effort of an Englishman’s carpentry and Antiochian iconography!)

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Glory to Thee o Lord, Glory to Thee! I have come to intimately know this warm Stavronian community with faithful from more than half a dozen nationalities (!) for two years and they have ever since become a part of my heart. They helped me so much during a time in need then, in Lancaster that I feel there is no way I can ever repay their prayerful support and practical help at that time.

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Fr. Jonathan Hemmings and lay reader Trevor Wearing

This Parish serves the liturgical and pastoral needs of Orthodox Christians studying and teaching at Lancaster University, from Greece and Cyprus and in more recent years from Romania and Russia. Yet far from it, this parish is not ‘too ethnic’ at all, but inter-national and ecumenical in the correct sense of the world; one may also encounter British people who have converted to Orthodoxy. A genuine “one holy, catholic and apostolic Church”. The Parish is dedicated to the Life-Giving Cross, and from what I have witnessed there during my brief stay and from all subsequent long visits, I have come to the conclusion that this dedication, like all dedications or patron, has an intimate relationship with the Community and those belonging to it. Their dedication and service to the Holy and Life Giving Cross is hard, narrow and steep but it is a glorious path

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Back in 2014, this was the nearest church I could go during my stay at Lancaster University, so I began attending church services there. Everything was so different from our ordinary churches in Greece! To begin with, for each and every Holy Liturgy we have had to “build”, furnish and dismantle the “Church” to give it some semblance of Orthodox character and creedal symbolism.” This was quite an extraordinary experience for a Greek who can choose which parish to go every Sunday, since there are plenty in every neighbourhood. And yet, somehow, this ‘fragile’, “weak thing of the world to confound the things which are mighty”; this base thing of the world, and thing which is despised’ , yet God hath chosen, yea, and this ‘thing which is not’, to bring to nought things that are” (cf. 1 Cor. 1:27-28), this church which could be ‘contained’ in just three pieces of luggage, was more powerful, holy and alive than all others I have been to here in Greece!

I vividly remember the awe I have repeatedly experienced there during the Sacraments of the Holy Unction and Baptisms where plain olive oil acquired through prayers a heavenly fragrance and was literally transformed! Or, icons during services began streaming myrrh (ie. a sweet-smelling oily substance). Or, the icons and secondary relics that I was offered as a present started to produce a sweet-smelling fragrance in my hotel room. But this was not the only surprise that the Lord had at store for me.

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St. Nicholas Planas by Dimitrios Hakim

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St. Joachim of Ithaca by Dimitrios Hakim

For the whole autumn semester, I regularly attended Services there, read theirnewsletter each month with their news and spiritual food for thought, studied their translations such as St. Lioba’s or St. Joachim’s life and enjoyed their book publications, most notably Fountains in the Desert, based on the sayings of St Antony. I also got acquainted to Celtic Saints and Celtic Orthodoxy— so Constantine the Great  was not (only) a Greek Saint but was acclaimed as emperor by the army at Eboracum (Modern-day York😃?! — and venerated the icons and holy relics of St. Nicholas Planas and St. Joachim of Ithaca that this parish is blessed to have. Can you imagine this? Venerating for the firsttime Greek Saints’ relics in Great Britain ?!

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Fr. Jonathan (left) embracing the aer with Fr. Theodosios (right) during the Holy Liturgy 
in the Church of St. Nicholas in Ithaka, Greece.

Most importantly, these months I  and enjoyed their fellowship, having meals together and taking part in pilgrimages to Orthodox monasteries, churches, ancient Christian sites and other worship places (photos). To get a taste of their fellowship, listen to the Holy Cross choir chant the Orthodox Psalm (135) “O Give thanks unto the Lord”, while looking at their photos, most of which come from our pilgrimage to St. Herbert’s Island, Derwentwater, UK. St. Herbert is an important Orthodox Saint in the area.

To my immense surprise my brief stay there served as the catalyst for the re-discovery of the Orthodox faith, a mystical Baptism for which I am infinitely grateful to them. While there, I have been most impressed by the spirit of prayer and the presence of God at the celebration of the Divine Liturgy at the University chapel and the spirit of ecumenical fellowship. Isn’t it an irony that the Holy Spirit chose to lead me ‘back’ to my cradle faith through a convert spiritual father ?! By the end of my stay there I knew my heart had chosen ‘them’ as my spiritual family, and everything had changed from ‘their’ to ‘our’. Thanks be to God I had discovered my spiritual oasis-retreat- fountain in the desert-home-pearl of great value! I had become a Stavronian myself!  😊

Last Easter, I felt that I had to celebrate Easter at Lancaster and what a Holy week we all had then! Our pilgrimage too during Bright Week to meet Fr. John Musther Of Cumbria at his church-home was an unforgettable experience!

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“The Church in The British Isles will only begin to grow when she begins to again venerate her own Saints”  (Saint Arsenios of Paros †1877)

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 And now, at long last, after 20 ‘crucified’ years, of using borrowed premises and enduring numerous hardships and trials, the Orthodox Community of the Holy and Life Giving Cross , has finally found a building for a Temple that will serve the needs of the Orthodox Christians in the Lancaster area.

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Sunday of the Orthodoxy and St. Cuthbert’s Day’,  one of England’s most beloved Wonderworking saints once greatly venerated here — Sancte Cutbertus ora pro nobis!

This new Temple seems to be a blessing from Father Jonathan’s spiritual grandfather, Blessed Seraphim Rose, who had a special love for the Celtic Saints, and St. Martin of Tours in particular.

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Cf. The prologue to Vita Patrum written by him:

“And then, even as the news of the phenomenon of Egyptian monasticism was still spreading through the West, the West produced its own ascetic miracle: St. Martin of Tours.  Even before his death in 397, his manuscript Life was being circulated in Gaul, Spain, Italy, and elsewhere in the West, revealing him as a monastic Father and wonderworker in no way inferior to the desert Fathers in the East.”

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Another spiritual ‘coincidence’ seems to be at stake. While reading St. Martin’svita a certain incident attracts our attention,

“CHAPTER III.   Christ appears to St. Martin.

ACCORDINGLY, at a certain period, when he had nothing except his arms and his simple military dress, in the middle of winter, a winter which had shown itself more severe than ordinary, so that the extreme cold was proving fatal to many, he happened to meet at the gate of the city of Amiens[8] a poor man destitute of clothing. He was entreating those that passed by to have compassion upon him, but all passed the wretched man without notice, when Martin, that man full of God, recognized that a being to whom others showed no pity, was, in that respect, left to him. Yet, what should he do? He had nothing except the cloak in which he was clad, for he had already parted with the rest of his garments for similar purposes. Taking, therefore, his sword with which he was girt, he divided his cloak into two equal parts, and gave one part to the poor man, while he again clothed himself with the remainder. Upon this, some of the by-standers laughed, because he was now an unsightly object, and stood out as but partly dressed. Many, however, who were of sounder understanding, groaned deeply because they themselves had done nothing similar. They especially felt this, because, being possessed of more than Martin, they could have clothed the poor man without reducing themselves to nakedness. In the following night, when Martin had resigned himself to sleep, he had a vision of Christ arrayed in that part of his cloak with which he had clothed the poor man. He contemplated the Lord with the greatest attention, and was told to own as his the robe which he had given. Ere long, he heard Jesus saying with a clear voice to the multitude of angels standing round — “Martin, who is still but a catechumen, clothed[9] me with this robe.” The Lord, truly mindful of his own words (who had said when on earth — “Inasmuch[10] as ye have done these things to one of the least of these, ye have done them unto me”), declared that he himself had been clothed in that poor man; and to confirm the testimony he bore to so good a deed, he condescended to show him himself in that very dress which the poor man had received.

Your mercy toward the poor man without clothes gained you, O Martin,

The vision of Christ, who said to the angels

‘Martin has clothed Me with this garment.

Have mercy on us who are poor

And who have no good works to clothe ourselves,

And pray to the Lord of the Universe

That He have mercy on our souls. (St. Martin of Tours Troparion, Tone 4)

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“The Charity of St. Martin” 

Likewise, this Holy Cross community have been given the use of the residence for half week, for Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays! 😃

In a sense, Divine Providence and the Communion of Saints is brought intoour (sic!) acquisition of the Church!

On St. Patrick’s Day, Father Jonathan Hemmings and five Stavronians made a pilgrimage to Heysham to St Patrick’s Chapel and Monastery at Heysham. Have a look at this lovely photo with the Faithful. Not only five though! Plus a host of angels and some onlookers- a group of five young people totally unrelated to the Stavronian community or the Orthodox Church asked if they could have a photo taken with the Icon of St Patrick!

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Heysham is where the great Saint Patrick crossed to Ireland to spread Christianity there. Father Jonathan is chanting St. Patrick’s Lorica (The Breastplate) ! Events like this are really important so that we reconnect with Britian’s Orthodox past. This pilgrimage brings tears to my eyes as I remember a pilgrimage, together with Father Jonathan, which took place 2 years ago. Such fond memories to treasure!

The Easter news of the Holy Cross parish are:

  • “We are doubly blessed to receive at Great and Holy Week a hand crafted Icon, a comb and a prayer rope that belonged to St Paisios and Reliquary for containing these holy relics. We will also have on loan  for Holy Week a piece of his clothing from another Monastery in Greece. Those from other Orthodox Parishes who wish to come to venerate these secondary holy relics of St Paisios should contact Jonathan so that we may offer appropriate hospitality.”
  • “We are blessed to welcome again the Byzantine St Anysia Choir from Thessalonika for Pascha who came last year to embellish our worship with their beautiful singing.

For more information about the Orthodox Christian Parish of the Holy and Life ­Giving Cross at Lancaster   visit http://www.orthodox-lancaster.org.uk

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“The Church in The British Isles will only begin to grow when she begins to again venerate her own Saints”  (Saint Arsenios of Paros †1877)

Continue reading “Holy and Life-Giving Cross, Orthodox Parish, Lancaster, England, UK – 2 Videos”

Link: Saint Adamnan of Iona – Saint Bride Hermitage, ROCOR Scotland

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https://saintadomnan.wordpress.com

Saint Adamnan of Iona

Saint Bride Hermitage, ROCOR Scotland

Why Orthodoxy? – Ryan Hunter, USA & Scotland – From Roman Catholicism to Orthodoxy

http://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

https://unitedkingdomofmyheart.wordpress.com

GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

USA OF MY HEART

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Ryan Hunter

Setauket, New York, USA

Brotherhood of the Holy Cross

East Setauket, Long Island, NY, USA

Holy Cross Orthodox Monastery

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Why Orthodoxy?

by

Ryan Hunter

(Part 1-14)

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.comHERE

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

After years of spiritual wandering and disillusionment, and studying all religions, I am entering the Eastern Orthodox Church: How I discovered new meaning in the word “catholic” and the true challenge of a Christian life

“In His unbounded love, God became what we are that He might make us what He is.” —St. Irenaeus (d. 202)

I am in love. The object of my affection, or rather, my devotion, is not a person per se, though it is very much alive. It has been alive for 2,000 years, persisting through seemingly insurmountable odds, and in that time it spread from the eastern shores of the Mediterranean north and east, ultimately to the shores of Alaska and the New World. Now it is very much established and thriving here in the US. What is this thing that has become such a defining part of my life?

I have fallen in love with the Orthodox Church.

It is difficult for me to render into words an account of the transformation that this awakening has wrought in all areas of my life. I feel myself to be at last truly satisfied, spiritually and emotionally. I feel enriched beyond description after years of an ever-present void. From the depths of my heart I sense that I am now a more fulfilled Christian, and above all I know that I am a more inspired human being. Sadly in this Continue reading “Why Orthodoxy? – Ryan Hunter, USA & Scotland – From Roman Catholicism to Orthodoxy”

Saint Ia, Missionary & Virgin Martyr in Cornwall, England, from Ireland (+450) – February 3

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https://unitedkingdomofmyheart.wordpress.com

GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

IRELAND OF MY HEART

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St Ives, Cornwall, England

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Ireland

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Saint Ia,

Missionary & Virgin Martyr in Cornwall, England,

from Ireland (+450)

February 3

Saint Ia of Cornwall (also known as Eia, Hia or Hya) was an evangelist and martyr of the 5th century in Cornwall. She was an Irish princess, the sister of Saint Erc of Slane and a student of Saint Baricus.

St Ia went to the seashore to depart for Cornwall from her native Ireland along with other saints. Finding that they had gone without her, fearing that she was too young for such a hazardous journey, she was grief-stricken and began to pray. As she prayed, she noticed a small leaf floating on the water and touched it with a rod to see if it would sink. As she watched, it grew bigger and bigger. Trusting God, she embarked upon the leaf and was carried across the Irish Sea. She reached Cornwall before the others, where she joined Saint Gwinear and Felec of Cornwall. They had up to 777 companions.

She founded an oratory in a clearing in a wood on the site of the existing Parish Church that is dedicated to her. Ia was martyred under “King Teudar” (i.e., Tewdwr Mawr of Penwith) on the River Hayle and buried at what is now St Ives, where St Ia’s Church—of which she is now the patron saint—was erected over her grave. The town built up around it. Her feast day is February 3.

Source: Wikipedia

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 St Ia of Ireland & Cornwall

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St. Ives, Cornwall, England

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Saint Nathalan (St Nachlan), Bishop of Tullich, Scotland (+678) – January 19

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The ancient Cowie Church of St Nathalan in Scotland

7th century

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Saint Nathalan / Nachlan

Bishop of Tullich, Scotland (+678)

January 19

Saint Nathalan or Nachlan (+678) is a saint who was active in the district now known as Aberdeenshire, Scotland. He is also known by the names Saint Nachlan and Saint Nauchlan.

Saint Nathalan was born in the village of Tullich, for which he was eventually appointed as bishop. The earliest church in Tullich was founded by Saint Nathalan in the 7th century. He also built churches at Bothelim and Colle. He was a nobleman who cultivated. He possessed a large estate, which he cultivated and distributed his harvest generously to the poor. He was one of the Apostles of that country.

Saint Nathalan is reputed to have built the first small chapel on the windswept clifftop at Cowie sometime during the 7th century.

One very rainy summer the great saint, in a moment’s weakness, cursed the rain which was hindering the harvest. In penitence for his great sin in cursing God’s creation, Saint Nathalan padlocked his right arm to his right leg, tossed the key into the River Dee and set off to walk to Rome to seek forgiveness. Upon reaching Rome he sat down to supper. However, when he cut open the fish laid before him he found the very key that he had thrown into the Dee many months previously. A pool in the river nearby is still known as “the key pool” for this reason.

Saint Nathalan died on 678.

Source: Wikipedia

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Video: Blessing the Graves – Bright Monday in York, England

http://orthodox-heart.blogspot.com

ORTHODOX HEART

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Yorkshire, England

Blessing the Graves – Bright Monday in York, England

Q&A – Father Zacharias of Essex Monastery, England – Video

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

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Q&A – Father Zacharias of Essex Monastery, England

Archimandrite Zacharias is a disciple of Elder Sophrony (of blessed memory), who was a disciple of St. Silouan of Mount Athos.

Presently, Fr. Zacharias is the abbot of the Monastery of St. John the Baptist, Essex, England founded by Elder Sophrony.

Link: ROCOR Western Rite in the United Kingdom

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ROCOR Western Rite in the United Kingdom